Downtown Austin Apartments For Rent

0    Real Estate  admin
Downtown Austin Apartments For Rent
16 Oct
2:12

Art, food, and music deep in the heart of Texas.
Walkable Bike-Friendly Food Dining Music Nightlife College

The stunning Texas Capitol towers over the landscape of Downtown Austin, quite possibly the hottest neighborhood in one of America’s favorite cities. Austin’s truly legendary nightlife scene is certainly not restricted to the famous 6th Street, although this particular Downtown thoroughfare definitely has its share of noteworthy watering holes. Live music is an integral element of the city, and nowhere is this more apparent than Downtown, where stages and venues of every description kick out a variety of tunes every night of the week. And of course, living in Downtown Austin comes with the benefit of one of America’s best selections of food, from exceptional local favorites like barbecue and Tex-Mex to eclectic food trucks and exotic international fare.

From a more practical standpoint, living in Downtown Austin puts you right at the heart of the city’s thriving business and government centers, meaning that many locals live near enough to walk or bike to work. The University of Texas campus sits just north of Downtown, making it an excellent location for students, faculty, and collegiate staff, as well as folks who want to be within walking distance of Longhorns home games.

Rent Trends

As of October 2017, the average apartment rent in Austin, TX is $1,595 for a studio, $2,125 for one bedroom, $3,234 for two bedrooms, and $5,975 for three bedrooms. Apartment rent in Austin has increased by 3.2% in the past year.

Ratings
Living in Downtown

The downtown neighborhood provides hungry locals with dining options for all tastes and budgets. Participate in a traditional Austin Sunday brunch at Moonshine Patio Bar & Grill, and feast on Southern comfort food. Be prepared for a wait, as locals show up in droves for the fried chicken and waffles, cheddar grits, and green chile macaroni. Head to Koriente for a quick, healthy dinner, and order the pan-seared ahi tuna served over a bed of greens, bell peppers and rice. This family-owned Asian fusion eatery prides itself on supplying Austin with fresh ingredients and affordable meals, and you can customize any dish with gluten-free and vegetarian substitutions. Join the late-night masses at the Kebabalicious food trailer for a perfectly hearty meal to end an eventful night out at the bars. Treat yourself to the beef or lamb kebab or a falafel wrap with tzatziki sauce, and don’t forget to add the feisty feta.

Enjoy world-famous barbecue at Franklin, where you can buy brisket and ribs by the pound. Bon Appetit magazine named Franklin the "Best BBQ" in the country, so you’ll definitely want to add this BBQ joint to your must-visit list when you move to Austin. If you have room, end your meal with a slice of pecan pie.

Austinites swarm downtown at night and on the weekends, with varying bar scenes depending on your mood. The famous 6th Street nightlife scene attracts a crowd as bars line both sides of the street, which closes off to traffic and becomes a pedestrian-only area on weekend nights. For a more laid-back vibe, make your way to Rainey Street, where you can find charming cottages that have turned into eclectic bars. Order a local beer at Icenhauer’s, where it feels like you’re sitting in the backyard of a friend’s house. Tucked away on a quiet side street, the Firehouse Lounge & Hostel serves craft cocktails in a secretive speakeasy setting. Enter the hidden bar by opening the sliding bookcase in the hostel lobby.

The Red River district revolves around live music, and music venues large and small line the streets. Catch a show any night of the week at the Mohawk, revered by locals, where you can see anyone from big musicians to obscure indie bands of all genres.

The city of Austin was born in this neighborhood. The streets maintain the same grid-like format designed by the first governing officials, and historic buildings have retained their original architecture along Congress Avenue. Following the establishment of the University of Texas and the state Capitol, Austin became a hub for education, politics, and commerce during the 1900s. The city has skyrocketed in size and population, with downtown being the thriving heartbeat of its economy and culture.

Tour the monumental Texas State Capitol, and witness government legislature in action. Hear the stories of Texas’ people at the Bullock Texas State History Museum, and celebrate the Día de Los Muertos festival at the Mexic-Arte Museum. The annual SxSW festival showcases the latest in film, tech and music from around the world at hundreds of venues downtown, including the Austin Convention Center and the live music joints on Red River Street.

As the most walkable neighborhood in Austin, locals scuttle about their busy days commuting to work or running errands nearby. Parking can be hard to come by during business hours and on weekend evenings, and you have to pay for your spot with the exception of Mondays through Wednesdays after 6 p.m. and all day Sundays. Hailing a cab should be a breeze, but on those crowded weekend nights, ordering an Uber ride could be more efficient than searching for an open taxi. Locals also use Car2Go, a network of Smart cars that members can rent throughout the city and park anywhere for free.

The Capital Metro bus system blankets the downtown area, making it easy for Austinites to forgo the use of a car. The only Metro Rail line in Austin begins downtown and runs through northern Austin.

Exercise caution when biking downtown, as traffic can be quite hectic at times, although bike lanes do exist on many roads. The main north-south freeways in Austin sandwich downtown, with I-35 on the eastern side and Mopac Loop 1 to the west.

Downtown’s cost of living rests at 22 percent above Austin’s average. Housing in this area can be very expensive, with an average rental rate of $2,165 for a one-bedroom residence. A single ride on the bus costs $1.25, and a day pass runs $2.50. As opposed to housing, beer turns out to be relatively affordable for a big city, at about $5 for a pint, with most places offering happy-hour discounts. Gas prices in this neighborhood tend to fall about 9 percent below the national average.

Austinites classify downtown as a shopper’s paradise thanks to high-end boutiques, chain retailers and quirky local shops that embody the city’s entrepreneurial spirit. Check out Toy Joy with some friends, and find virtually any nostalgic toy you can remember, or just stare in amazement at the selection of oddball trinkets and games. This legendary toy shop has been around since the 1980s and has relocated to the 2nd Street District, the contemporary nucleus of downtown shopping. Locals consider BookPeople, which showcases both modern and classic authors of all genres, to be more of a destination than a bookstore. Staff picks appear on the shelves to guide readers, and the community gathers here to attend frequent book signings by well-known authors.

A few small, urban markets owned by Royal Blue Grocery dot the area. Part convenience store with prepared foods and part grocery store with fresh produce, this upscale vendor opens early and closes late to accommodate the needs of downtown dwellers. The flagship Whole Foods Market resides in the downtown neighborhood, and its in-house café, bar, wine cellar, cooking classes and rooftop events make it much more than your average grocery store. Stock up on locally farmed fruits and vegetables at the SFC Farmers’ Market at 4th & Guadalupe every Saturday from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.

At the southern edge of downtown, the highlight of outdoor recreation in Austin revolves around Ladybird Lake, where locals stave off the heat by kayaking and stand-up paddle boarding. Take your dog for a walk along the public Hike and Bike Trail, and enjoy scenic views of the skyline and river. Play disc golf with the family at the Auditorium Shores field, which also hosts the hip music and comedy festival Fun Fun Fun Fest and numerous SxSW music showcases. Republic Square Park serves as a green escape amid a sea of tall buildings, holding a free outdoor movie series in the summer put on by the Alamo Drafthouse. The Austin Food and Wine Festival takes over the historical square to kick off its festivities each spring, and free Yoga in the Park occurs every Wednesday during the spring and fall.

Art, food, and music deep in the heart of Texas.
Walkable Bike-Friendly Food Dining Music Nightlife College

The stunning Texas Capitol towers over the landscape of Downtown Austin, quite possibly the hottest neighborhood in one of America’s favorite cities. Austin’s truly legendary nightlife scene is certainly not restricted to the famous 6th Street, although this particular Downtown thoroughfare definitely has its share of noteworthy watering holes. Live music is an integral element of the city, and nowhere is this more apparent than Downtown, where stages and venues of every description kick out a variety of tunes every night of the week. And of course, living in Downtown Austin comes with the benefit of one of America’s best selections of food, from exceptional local favorites like barbecue and Tex-Mex to eclectic food trucks and exotic international fare.

From a more practical standpoint, living in Downtown Austin puts you right at the heart of the city’s thriving business and government centers, meaning that many locals live near enough to walk or bike to work. The University of Texas campus sits just north of Downtown, making it an excellent location for students, faculty, and collegiate staff, as well as folks who want to be within walking distance of Longhorns home games.

Rent Trends

As of October 2017, the average apartment rent in Austin, TX is $1,595 for a studio, $2,125 for one bedroom, $3,234 for two bedrooms, and $5,975 for three bedrooms. Apartment rent in Austin has increased by 3.2% in the past year.

Ratings
Living in Downtown

The downtown neighborhood provides hungry locals with dining options for all tastes and budgets. Participate in a traditional Austin Sunday brunch at Moonshine Patio Bar & Grill, and feast on Southern comfort food. Be prepared for a wait, as locals show up in droves for the fried chicken and waffles, cheddar grits, and green chile macaroni. Head to Koriente for a quick, healthy dinner, and order the pan-seared ahi tuna served over a bed of greens, bell peppers and rice. This family-owned Asian fusion eatery prides itself on supplying Austin with fresh ingredients and affordable meals, and you can customize any dish with gluten-free and vegetarian substitutions. Join the late-night masses at the Kebabalicious food trailer for a perfectly hearty meal to end an eventful night out at the bars. Treat yourself to the beef or lamb kebab or a falafel wrap with tzatziki sauce, and don’t forget to add the feisty feta.

Enjoy world-famous barbecue at Franklin, where you can buy brisket and ribs by the pound. Bon Appetit magazine named Franklin the "Best BBQ" in the country, so you’ll definitely want to add this BBQ joint to your must-visit list when you move to Austin. If you have room, end your meal with a slice of pecan pie.

Austinites swarm downtown at night and on the weekends, with varying bar scenes depending on your mood. The famous 6th Street nightlife scene attracts a crowd as bars line both sides of the street, which closes off to traffic and becomes a pedestrian-only area on weekend nights. For a more laid-back vibe, make your way to Rainey Street, where you can find charming cottages that have turned into eclectic bars. Order a local beer at Icenhauer’s, where it feels like you’re sitting in the backyard of a friend’s house. Tucked away on a quiet side street, the Firehouse Lounge & Hostel serves craft cocktails in a secretive speakeasy setting. Enter the hidden bar by opening the sliding bookcase in the hostel lobby.

The Red River district revolves around live music, and music venues large and small line the streets. Catch a show any night of the week at the Mohawk, revered by locals, where you can see anyone from big musicians to obscure indie bands of all genres.

The city of Austin was born in this neighborhood. The streets maintain the same grid-like format designed by the first governing officials, and historic buildings have retained their original architecture along Congress Avenue. Following the establishment of the University of Texas and the state Capitol, Austin became a hub for education, politics, and commerce during the 1900s. The city has skyrocketed in size and population, with downtown being the thriving heartbeat of its economy and culture.

Tour the monumental Texas State Capitol, and witness government legislature in action. Hear the stories of Texas’ people at the Bullock Texas State History Museum, and celebrate the Día de Los Muertos festival at the Mexic-Arte Museum. The annual SxSW festival showcases the latest in film, tech and music from around the world at hundreds of venues downtown, including the Austin Convention Center and the live music joints on Red River Street.

As the most walkable neighborhood in Austin, locals scuttle about their busy days commuting to work or running errands nearby. Parking can be hard to come by during business hours and on weekend evenings, and you have to pay for your spot with the exception of Mondays through Wednesdays after 6 p.m. and all day Sundays. Hailing a cab should be a breeze, but on those crowded weekend nights, ordering an Uber ride could be more efficient than searching for an open taxi. Locals also use Car2Go, a network of Smart cars that members can rent throughout the city and park anywhere for free.

The Capital Metro bus system blankets the downtown area, making it easy for Austinites to forgo the use of a car. The only Metro Rail line in Austin begins downtown and runs through northern Austin.

Exercise caution when biking downtown, as traffic can be quite hectic at times, although bike lanes do exist on many roads. The main north-south freeways in Austin sandwich downtown, with I-35 on the eastern side and Mopac Loop 1 to the west.

Downtown’s cost of living rests at 22 percent above Austin’s average. Housing in this area can be very expensive, with an average rental rate of $2,165 for a one-bedroom residence. A single ride on the bus costs $1.25, and a day pass runs $2.50. As opposed to housing, beer turns out to be relatively affordable for a big city, at about $5 for a pint, with most places offering happy-hour discounts. Gas prices in this neighborhood tend to fall about 9 percent below the national average.

Austinites classify downtown as a shopper’s paradise thanks to high-end boutiques, chain retailers and quirky local shops that embody the city’s entrepreneurial spirit. Check out Toy Joy with some friends, and find virtually any nostalgic toy you can remember, or just stare in amazement at the selection of oddball trinkets and games. This legendary toy shop has been around since the 1980s and has relocated to the 2nd Street District, the contemporary nucleus of downtown shopping. Locals consider BookPeople, which showcases both modern and classic authors of all genres, to be more of a destination than a bookstore. Staff picks appear on the shelves to guide readers, and the community gathers here to attend frequent book signings by well-known authors.

A few small, urban markets owned by Royal Blue Grocery dot the area. Part convenience store with prepared foods and part grocery store with fresh produce, this upscale vendor opens early and closes late to accommodate the needs of downtown dwellers. The flagship Whole Foods Market resides in the downtown neighborhood, and its in-house café, bar, wine cellar, cooking classes and rooftop events make it much more than your average grocery store. Stock up on locally farmed fruits and vegetables at the SFC Farmers’ Market at 4th & Guadalupe every Saturday from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.

At the southern edge of downtown, the highlight of outdoor recreation in Austin revolves around Ladybird Lake, where locals stave off the heat by kayaking and stand-up paddle boarding. Take your dog for a walk along the public Hike and Bike Trail, and enjoy scenic views of the skyline and river. Play disc golf with the family at the Auditorium Shores field, which also hosts the hip music and comedy festival Fun Fun Fun Fest and numerous SxSW music showcases. Republic Square Park serves as a green escape amid a sea of tall buildings, holding a free outdoor movie series in the summer put on by the Alamo Drafthouse. The Austin Food and Wine Festival takes over the historical square to kick off its festivities each spring, and free Yoga in the Park occurs every Wednesday during the spring and fall.

Art, food, and music deep in the heart of Texas.
Walkable Bike-Friendly Food Dining Music Nightlife College

The stunning Texas Capitol towers over the landscape of Downtown Austin, quite possibly the hottest neighborhood in one of America’s favorite cities. Austin’s truly legendary nightlife scene is certainly not restricted to the famous 6th Street, although this particular Downtown thoroughfare definitely has its share of noteworthy watering holes. Live music is an integral element of the city, and nowhere is this more apparent than Downtown, where stages and venues of every description kick out a variety of tunes every night of the week. And of course, living in Downtown Austin comes with the benefit of one of America’s best selections of food, from exceptional local favorites like barbecue and Tex-Mex to eclectic food trucks and exotic international fare.

From a more practical standpoint, living in Downtown Austin puts you right at the heart of the city’s thriving business and government centers, meaning that many locals live near enough to walk or bike to work. The University of Texas campus sits just north of Downtown, making it an excellent location for students, faculty, and collegiate staff, as well as folks who want to be within walking distance of Longhorns home games.

Rent Trends

As of October 2017, the average apartment rent in Austin, TX is $1,595 for a studio, $2,125 for one bedroom, $3,234 for two bedrooms, and $5,975 for three bedrooms. Apartment rent in Austin has increased by 3.2% in the past year.

Ratings
Living in Downtown

The downtown neighborhood provides hungry locals with dining options for all tastes and budgets. Participate in a traditional Austin Sunday brunch at Moonshine Patio Bar & Grill, and feast on Southern comfort food. Be prepared for a wait, as locals show up in droves for the fried chicken and waffles, cheddar grits, and green chile macaroni. Head to Koriente for a quick, healthy dinner, and order the pan-seared ahi tuna served over a bed of greens, bell peppers and rice. This family-owned Asian fusion eatery prides itself on supplying Austin with fresh ingredients and affordable meals, and you can customize any dish with gluten-free and vegetarian substitutions. Join the late-night masses at the Kebabalicious food trailer for a perfectly hearty meal to end an eventful night out at the bars. Treat yourself to the beef or lamb kebab or a falafel wrap with tzatziki sauce, and don’t forget to add the feisty feta.

Enjoy world-famous barbecue at Franklin, where you can buy brisket and ribs by the pound. Bon Appetit magazine named Franklin the "Best BBQ" in the country, so you’ll definitely want to add this BBQ joint to your must-visit list when you move to Austin. If you have room, end your meal with a slice of pecan pie.

Austinites swarm downtown at night and on the weekends, with varying bar scenes depending on your mood. The famous 6th Street nightlife scene attracts a crowd as bars line both sides of the street, which closes off to traffic and becomes a pedestrian-only area on weekend nights. For a more laid-back vibe, make your way to Rainey Street, where you can find charming cottages that have turned into eclectic bars. Order a local beer at Icenhauer’s, where it feels like you’re sitting in the backyard of a friend’s house. Tucked away on a quiet side street, the Firehouse Lounge & Hostel serves craft cocktails in a secretive speakeasy setting. Enter the hidden bar by opening the sliding bookcase in the hostel lobby.

The Red River district revolves around live music, and music venues large and small line the streets. Catch a show any night of the week at the Mohawk, revered by locals, where you can see anyone from big musicians to obscure indie bands of all genres.

The city of Austin was born in this neighborhood. The streets maintain the same grid-like format designed by the first governing officials, and historic buildings have retained their original architecture along Congress Avenue. Following the establishment of the University of Texas and the state Capitol, Austin became a hub for education, politics, and commerce during the 1900s. The city has skyrocketed in size and population, with downtown being the thriving heartbeat of its economy and culture.

Tour the monumental Texas State Capitol, and witness government legislature in action. Hear the stories of Texas’ people at the Bullock Texas State History Museum, and celebrate the Día de Los Muertos festival at the Mexic-Arte Museum. The annual SxSW festival showcases the latest in film, tech and music from around the world at hundreds of venues downtown, including the Austin Convention Center and the live music joints on Red River Street.

As the most walkable neighborhood in Austin, locals scuttle about their busy days commuting to work or running errands nearby. Parking can be hard to come by during business hours and on weekend evenings, and you have to pay for your spot with the exception of Mondays through Wednesdays after 6 p.m. and all day Sundays. Hailing a cab should be a breeze, but on those crowded weekend nights, ordering an Uber ride could be more efficient than searching for an open taxi. Locals also use Car2Go, a network of Smart cars that members can rent throughout the city and park anywhere for free.

The Capital Metro bus system blankets the downtown area, making it easy for Austinites to forgo the use of a car. The only Metro Rail line in Austin begins downtown and runs through northern Austin.

Exercise caution when biking downtown, as traffic can be quite hectic at times, although bike lanes do exist on many roads. The main north-south freeways in Austin sandwich downtown, with I-35 on the eastern side and Mopac Loop 1 to the west.

Downtown’s cost of living rests at 22 percent above Austin’s average. Housing in this area can be very expensive, with an average rental rate of $2,165 for a one-bedroom residence. A single ride on the bus costs $1.25, and a day pass runs $2.50. As opposed to housing, beer turns out to be relatively affordable for a big city, at about $5 for a pint, with most places offering happy-hour discounts. Gas prices in this neighborhood tend to fall about 9 percent below the national average.

Austinites classify downtown as a shopper’s paradise thanks to high-end boutiques, chain retailers and quirky local shops that embody the city’s entrepreneurial spirit. Check out Toy Joy with some friends, and find virtually any nostalgic toy you can remember, or just stare in amazement at the selection of oddball trinkets and games. This legendary toy shop has been around since the 1980s and has relocated to the 2nd Street District, the contemporary nucleus of downtown shopping. Locals consider BookPeople, which showcases both modern and classic authors of all genres, to be more of a destination than a bookstore. Staff picks appear on the shelves to guide readers, and the community gathers here to attend frequent book signings by well-known authors.

A few small, urban markets owned by Royal Blue Grocery dot the area. Part convenience store with prepared foods and part grocery store with fresh produce, this upscale vendor opens early and closes late to accommodate the needs of downtown dwellers. The flagship Whole Foods Market resides in the downtown neighborhood, and its in-house café, bar, wine cellar, cooking classes and rooftop events make it much more than your average grocery store. Stock up on locally farmed fruits and vegetables at the SFC Farmers’ Market at 4th & Guadalupe every Saturday from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.

At the southern edge of downtown, the highlight of outdoor recreation in Austin revolves around Ladybird Lake, where locals stave off the heat by kayaking and stand-up paddle boarding. Take your dog for a walk along the public Hike and Bike Trail, and enjoy scenic views of the skyline and river. Play disc golf with the family at the Auditorium Shores field, which also hosts the hip music and comedy festival Fun Fun Fun Fest and numerous SxSW music showcases. Republic Square Park serves as a green escape amid a sea of tall buildings, holding a free outdoor movie series in the summer put on by the Alamo Drafthouse. The Austin Food and Wine Festival takes over the historical square to kick off its festivities each spring, and free Yoga in the Park occurs every Wednesday during the spring and fall.

Art, food, and music deep in the heart of Texas.
Walkable Bike-Friendly Food Dining Music Nightlife College

The stunning Texas Capitol towers over the landscape of Downtown Austin, quite possibly the hottest neighborhood in one of America’s favorite cities. Austin’s truly legendary nightlife scene is certainly not restricted to the famous 6th Street, although this particular Downtown thoroughfare definitely has its share of noteworthy watering holes. Live music is an integral element of the city, and nowhere is this more apparent than Downtown, where stages and venues of every description kick out a variety of tunes every night of the week. And of course, living in Downtown Austin comes with the benefit of one of America’s best selections of food, from exceptional local favorites like barbecue and Tex-Mex to eclectic food trucks and exotic international fare.

From a more practical standpoint, living in Downtown Austin puts you right at the heart of the city’s thriving business and government centers, meaning that many locals live near enough to walk or bike to work. The University of Texas campus sits just north of Downtown, making it an excellent location for students, faculty, and collegiate staff, as well as folks who want to be within walking distance of Longhorns home games.

Rent Trends

As of October 2017, the average apartment rent in Austin, TX is $1,603 for a studio, $2,119 for one bedroom, $3,240 for two bedrooms, and $5,966 for three bedrooms. Apartment rent in Austin has increased by 3.0% in the past year.

Ratings
Living in Downtown

The downtown neighborhood provides hungry locals with dining options for all tastes and budgets. Participate in a traditional Austin Sunday brunch at Moonshine Patio Bar & Grill, and feast on Southern comfort food. Be prepared for a wait, as locals show up in droves for the fried chicken and waffles, cheddar grits, and green chile macaroni. Head to Koriente for a quick, healthy dinner, and order the pan-seared ahi tuna served over a bed of greens, bell peppers and rice. This family-owned Asian fusion eatery prides itself on supplying Austin with fresh ingredients and affordable meals, and you can customize any dish with gluten-free and vegetarian substitutions. Join the late-night masses at the Kebabalicious food trailer for a perfectly hearty meal to end an eventful night out at the bars. Treat yourself to the beef or lamb kebab or a falafel wrap with tzatziki sauce, and don’t forget to add the feisty feta.

Enjoy world-famous barbecue at Franklin, where you can buy brisket and ribs by the pound. Bon Appetit magazine named Franklin the "Best BBQ" in the country, so you’ll definitely want to add this BBQ joint to your must-visit list when you move to Austin. If you have room, end your meal with a slice of pecan pie.

Austinites swarm downtown at night and on the weekends, with varying bar scenes depending on your mood. The famous 6th Street nightlife scene attracts a crowd as bars line both sides of the street, which closes off to traffic and becomes a pedestrian-only area on weekend nights. For a more laid-back vibe, make your way to Rainey Street, where you can find charming cottages that have turned into eclectic bars. Order a local beer at Icenhauer’s, where it feels like you’re sitting in the backyard of a friend’s house. Tucked away on a quiet side street, the Firehouse Lounge & Hostel serves craft cocktails in a secretive speakeasy setting. Enter the hidden bar by opening the sliding bookcase in the hostel lobby.

The Red River district revolves around live music, and music venues large and small line the streets. Catch a show any night of the week at the Mohawk, revered by locals, where you can see anyone from big musicians to obscure indie bands of all genres.

The city of Austin was born in this neighborhood. The streets maintain the same grid-like format designed by the first governing officials, and historic buildings have retained their original architecture along Congress Avenue. Following the establishment of the University of Texas and the state Capitol, Austin became a hub for education, politics, and commerce during the 1900s. The city has skyrocketed in size and population, with downtown being the thriving heartbeat of its economy and culture.

Tour the monumental Texas State Capitol, and witness government legislature in action. Hear the stories of Texas’ people at the Bullock Texas State History Museum, and celebrate the Día de Los Muertos festival at the Mexic-Arte Museum. The annual SxSW festival showcases the latest in film, tech and music from around the world at hundreds of venues downtown, including the Austin Convention Center and the live music joints on Red River Street.

As the most walkable neighborhood in Austin, locals scuttle about their busy days commuting to work or running errands nearby. Parking can be hard to come by during business hours and on weekend evenings, and you have to pay for your spot with the exception of Mondays through Wednesdays after 6 p.m. and all day Sundays. Hailing a cab should be a breeze, but on those crowded weekend nights, ordering an Uber ride could be more efficient than searching for an open taxi. Locals also use Car2Go, a network of Smart cars that members can rent throughout the city and park anywhere for free.

The Capital Metro bus system blankets the downtown area, making it easy for Austinites to forgo the use of a car. The only Metro Rail line in Austin begins downtown and runs through northern Austin.

Exercise caution when biking downtown, as traffic can be quite hectic at times, although bike lanes do exist on many roads. The main north-south freeways in Austin sandwich downtown, with I-35 on the eastern side and Mopac Loop 1 to the west.

Downtown’s cost of living rests at 22 percent above Austin’s average. Housing in this area can be very expensive, with an average rental rate of $2,165 for a one-bedroom residence. A single ride on the bus costs $1.25, and a day pass runs $2.50. As opposed to housing, beer turns out to be relatively affordable for a big city, at about $5 for a pint, with most places offering happy-hour discounts. Gas prices in this neighborhood tend to fall about 9 percent below the national average.

Austinites classify downtown as a shopper’s paradise thanks to high-end boutiques, chain retailers and quirky local shops that embody the city’s entrepreneurial spirit. Check out Toy Joy with some friends, and find virtually any nostalgic toy you can remember, or just stare in amazement at the selection of oddball trinkets and games. This legendary toy shop has been around since the 1980s and has relocated to the 2nd Street District, the contemporary nucleus of downtown shopping. Locals consider BookPeople, which showcases both modern and classic authors of all genres, to be more of a destination than a bookstore. Staff picks appear on the shelves to guide readers, and the community gathers here to attend frequent book signings by well-known authors.

A few small, urban markets owned by Royal Blue Grocery dot the area. Part convenience store with prepared foods and part grocery store with fresh produce, this upscale vendor opens early and closes late to accommodate the needs of downtown dwellers. The flagship Whole Foods Market resides in the downtown neighborhood, and its in-house café, bar, wine cellar, cooking classes and rooftop events make it much more than your average grocery store. Stock up on locally farmed fruits and vegetables at the SFC Farmers’ Market at 4th & Guadalupe every Saturday from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.

At the southern edge of downtown, the highlight of outdoor recreation in Austin revolves around Ladybird Lake, where locals stave off the heat by kayaking and stand-up paddle boarding. Take your dog for a walk along the public Hike and Bike Trail, and enjoy scenic views of the skyline and river. Play disc golf with the family at the Auditorium Shores field, which also hosts the hip music and comedy festival Fun Fun Fun Fest and numerous SxSW music showcases. Republic Square Park serves as a green escape amid a sea of tall buildings, holding a free outdoor movie series in the summer put on by the Alamo Drafthouse. The Austin Food and Wine Festival takes over the historical square to kick off its festivities each spring, and free Yoga in the Park occurs every Wednesday during the spring and fall.

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